Firewall

Purpose: The purpose of the Firewall template is to document network zones designated by firewalls.

Core concerns: The Firewall template enables you to model Zones, Computers, Networks and Firewall Policies to create a model of a firewall. A firewall is used to control the communication between different networks, typically for security reasons.

Graphical representation of objects:

A Firewall diagram will typically show the Zones of the firewall and the communication policies/rules (Firewall Policies) that exist between the zones. Below, you can see an example of a Firewall diagram containing Zones and Servers (represented by the Computer object):

Firewall_1

Relation to other templates: The Firewall template is a technology template and related to the Infrastructure Diagram.

Properties and metadata: The Firewall template ­­­­can for example retain the following information:

  • A description of the diagram
  • Link to Vendor and Hardware
  • Link to servers
  • Contract information
  • Details about resources, costs and benefits
  • Audits (auto generated information regarding its current state and access rights)
  • Associated documents, diagrams and other objects
  • Inherent Risk detailing risk considerations
  • Governance information detailing information about the published diagram and who has been involved in the approval of the diagram

 

The above picture shows the properties dialogue window for the Firewall template, where you can view and edit the diagram’s properties in QualiWare Lifecycle Manager.

Deployment Diagram

Purpose: The purpose of the Deployment Diagram is to document the configuration of run-time processing nodes and the components they contain.

Core concerns: The Deployment Diagram template is structural UML diagram that enables you to model Packages, Components, Artifacts, Instance Specifications, Properties, Nodes, Devices, Execution Environments, Deployment Specifications, Objects, Classes, Interfaces, and Annotations. They can then be connected through Association, Dependency, Generalization, Deployment or Manifestation.

The Deployment Diagram models how the different hardware component and software components are connected. Below you can see an example of a Deployment Diagram for a booking service:

DeploymentDiagram_1

In the next example, you can see how Packages and Components would be included in a Deployment Diagram:

DeploymentDiagram_2

Relation to other templates: The Deployment Diagram is, as a component model, part of the application domain on the operational level. As such, it offers a complimentary view to those of the Application Architecture Diagram, Class Diagram, Component Diagram, Data Flow Diagram, Data Mapping Diagram, Data Replication Diagram, Sequence Diagram, State Event Diagram, Structure Chart, and Use Case Diagram.

Properties and metadata: The Deployment Diagram can for example retain the following information:

  • A description of the diagram
  • Link to the owner of the diagram
  • Link to the one responsible for the diagram
  • Links to extensions such as Stereotypes and Constraints
  • Audits (auto generated information regarding its current state and access rights)
  • Associated documents, diagrams and other objects
  • Inherent Risk detailing risk considerations
  • Governance information detailing information about the published diagram and who has been involved in the approval of the diagram

The above picture shows the properties dialogue window for the Deployment Diagram where you can view and edit the diagram’s properties in QualiWare Lifecycle Manager.

 

 

 

 

 

Class Diagram

Purpose: The purpose of the Class Diagram template is to document the structural aspects of a system using the UML. Below, an example of a simple Class Diagram is shown:

ClassDiagram_2

Core concerns: The class diagram shows the system’s classes, attributes, operations and the relationships between classes and other objects such as packages. Below you can se an example of a Class Diagram where the relationship between the Classes “Customer” and “Internet user” with the packages “WEB-API”, “Reservation Control”, “GUI” and “Database” is shown:

ClassDiagram_1

Relation to other templates: The Class Diagram presents a detailed structural view of information. It can for example be a decomposition of an Information System which typically is presented in an Application Architecture Diagram. If a Class Diagram becomes too complex or large, a Package Diagram, where the classes are grouped into Packages, could be modelled instead.

Properties and metadata: The Class Diagram can for example retain the following information:

  • A description of the diagram
  • Link to the owner of the diagram
  • Link to the one responsible for the diagram
  • Audits (auto generated information regarding its current state and access rights)
  • Extensions regarding constraints and tagged values
  • Associated documents, diagrams and other objects
  • Inherent Risk detailing risk considerations
  • Governance information detailing information about the published diagram and who has been involved in the approval of the diagram

In the picture below you can see the Class Diagrams properties dialogue window, where the information can be viewed and edited:

 

Application Usage Viewpoint

Purpose: Designing, deciding

Concerns: Consistency and completeness, reduction of complexity

Scope: Multiple layer/Multiple aspect

The application usage viewpoint describes how applications are used to support one or more business processes, and how they are used by other applications. It can be used in designing an application by identifying the services needed by business processes and other applications, or in designing business processes by describing the services that are available. Furthermore, since it identifies the dependencies of business processes upon applications, it may be useful to operational managers responsible for these processes.

Abstraction Level
Coherence

Layer
Business and application layers

Aspects
Behavior, active structure, passive structure

ApplicationUsageViewpoint_1

Application Platform Viewpoint

Scope: Multiple layer/Multiple aspect

Shows structure of a typical application platform and how it relates to supporting technology.

 

Application Functionality Context

Purpose: The purpose of the Application Functionality Context template is to document the in which Activities and/or Business Processes a given Application Functionality is used.

Core concerns: The Application Functionality Context template can be used to create graphical views showing where Application Functionalities are used. The template enables you to model Application Functionalities, Activities and Business Processes. The Business Processes and Activities are connected to Application Functionalities using Functionality Usage.

Below, you can see an example of an Application functionality contest diagram, where the context for the DocCom – Create and Store Document functionality is shown:

The diagram shows which Business Processes use the Application Functionality as well as which Information System delivers it.

Relation to other templates: To map applications hardware, the Application Architecture Diagram or Infrastructure Diagram template should be used. The Application Functionality Context template graphically connects functionalities of Information Systems to the Processes and Activities in which they are used. It offers an additional view to Application Architecture Diagrams, Workflow Diagrams, Business Process Diagrams and Business Process Networks.

Properties and metadata: The Application Functionality Context template ­­­­can for example retain the following information:

  • A description of the diagram
  • Audits (auto generated information regarding its current state and access rights)
  • Associated documents, diagrams and other objects
  • Inherent Risk detailing risk considerations
  • Governance information detailing information about the published diagram and who has been involved in the approval of the diagram

The above picture shows the properties dialogue window for the Application Functionality Context template where you can view and edit the diagram’s properties in QualiWare Lifecycle Manager.

Requirements Realization Viewpoint

Concerns: Architecture strategy and tactics, motivation
Purpose: Designing, deciding, informing
Scope: Motivation

The requirements realization viewpoint allows the designer to model the realization of requirements by the core elements, such as business actors, business services, business processes, application services, application components, etc. Typically, the requirements result from the goal refinement viewpoint.

In addition, this viewpoint can be used to refine requirements into more detailed requirements. The aggregation relationship is used for this purpose.

Application Architecture Diagram

Purpose: The purpose of an Application Architecture Diagram is to show the structure of an Information System and its relations to other Information Systems.

Core concerns: The Application Architecture Diagram is used to document the application/systems layer. It can show information flows and system dependencies between Information Systems as well as depict system components and system areas.

The above picture shows an example of an Application Architecture Diagram depicting an overview of the Information Systems related to BEO. The information systems are connected by arrows that symbolize system dependencies.

Other functionalities: Application Architecture Diagrams can be analyzed in QualiWare via the toolbar for Application Portfolio Management. The Application Portfolio Management tools offers analysis for redundant functionalities, performance matrix generation, system heat map generation, asset lifecycle view (se below picture), lifecycle dependencies, and capabilities delivered by multiple information systems.

The above picture shows the Asset Lifecycle of the Information System ‘BEO’ and the Information Systems related to it is shown. The information depicted is pulled from the Information Systems’ metadata.

Relation to other templates: The elements depicted in the Application Architecture Diagram can be described in further detail in another Application Architecture Diagram, or in related diagrams such as a Data Flow Diagram.

The above picture shows an example of a more detailed view of an information system. In this Application Architecture Diagram the System Components are visible.

For documentation of a physical or hardware layer, the Infrastructure Diagram template can be used.

Properties and metadata: The Application Architecture Diagram can for example retain the following information:

  • A description of the diagram
  • Link to the owner of the application architecture
  • Link to the one responsible for the application architecture
  • Audits (auto generated information regarding its current state and access rights)
  • Associated documents, diagrams and other objects
  • Inherent Risk detailing risk considerations
  • Governance information detailing information about the published diagram and who has been involved in the approval of the diagram

The above picture shows the properties dialogue window for the Application Architecture Diagram where you can view and edit the diagram’s properties in QualiWare Lifecycle Manager.

Activity Diagram

Purpose: The purpose of the Activity Diagram is to show the overall flow of control through workflows for computational and organizational processes using the UML standard.

Core concerns: The Activity Diagram enables you to document stepwise activities and actions with support for choice, iteration and concurrency. The template allows you to connect the following objects using either Control Flows, Object Flows or Exception Handlers:

Below, you can see two different examples of an Activity Diagram. The first illustrates a structure for an ideation process, the second shows the process for Booking an order – divided into two different Activity Partitions:

ActivityDiagram_2

ActivityDiagram_1

Relation to other templates: The Activity Diagram can be used instead of a Workflow Diagram or a Business Process Diagram, though the different languages have their own pros and cons. The Activity Diagram is part of the UML templates QualiWare supports along with the Communication Diagram, Deployment Diagram, Class Diagram, Composite Structure Diagram, State Diagram, Package Diagram, Component Diagram, Sequence Diagram, Use case diagram and Timing Diagram.

Properties and metadata: The Activity Diagram ­­­­can for example retain the following information:

  • A description of the diagram
  • Link to the owner of the diagram
  • Link to the one responsible for the diagram
  • Audits (auto generated information regarding its current state and access rights)
  • Extensions: Stereotypes, constraints and tagged values
  • Associated documents, diagrams and other objects
  • Inherent Risk detailing risk considerations
  • Governance information detailing information about the published diagram and who has been involved in the approval of the diagram

The above picture shows the properties dialogue window for the Activity Diagram where you can view and edit the diagram’s properties in QualiWare Lifecycle Manager.

For more information: about the UML and Activity Diagram, please visit the Object Management Group’s Website, where you can find the complete specification.