QualiWare + EA Professional Development Days 2017


presents the 2017 QualiWare + EA Professional Development Days 2017

Ottawa, February 6-10, 2017

[eyesonly logged=”in”]Presentations – 2017 QualiWare+EA Professional Development Days Presentations (Ottawa, Canada)

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CloseReach and QualiWare invite you to join us for the 3rd annual QualiWare + EA Professional Development Days. An event to promote networking, learning and collaboration for Architects and QualiWare enthusiasts, novices and experts alike.

Meet other QualiWare users, Business and Enterprise Architects, Project Managers, Analysts, BPM Specialists and Quality Managers. Share architecture and QualiWare experiences. Learn from customer case studies. Take part in interactive ideas exchanges. Influence product development.

Building on the success of 2016, we will be expanding your opportunities for learning and knowledge sharing. Join us for this excellent professional development opportunity:

Speakers Day (Monday) – the best place to hear about the latest developments in enterprise architecture and business transformation in Canada and globally. Speakers Day early bird pricing is in effect: $250 per person, 5-pack: $1,125.00, 10-pack: $2,125.00. HST extra. Includes a great day of speakers as well as breakfast and lunch.

Featured Speakers:

  • Kuno Brodersen – EA and Digital Transformation Strategies
    • A leader in the business modeling and enterprise architecture field for more than 30 years.
    • CEO and Co- Founder of QualiWare ApS. QualiWare provides comprehensive modeling tools and consulting services that focus on enhancing business efficiency, effectiveness, productivity, competitive positioning, and organizational profitability. QualiWare’s products and services help the customer succeed with Quality Management, Process Management and Optimization initiatives, Business Excellence programs, Enterprise Architecture initiatives, and/or IT solution development needs.
  • Roger Burlton – A Journey from Business Architecture to a Digital Process? A Case Study in Government Transformation
    • Respected pioneer in the introduction of innovative approaches for Business Architecture and Process Management
    • A leader in the field of Business Process Management, having authored one of the most
      read and followed books on the topic early in BPM’s growth.
    • Chair of the BPTrends.com Advisory Board
  • Stephen Challinor – Enterprise Architecture as a Business Enabler
    • Director Enterprise Architecture, Department of National Defence
    • Co-Chair Government of Canada EA Working Group
    • 27-year career as a public servant with a broad background in complex project and procurement management, weapon systems and equipment management, business and financial management, IM/IT systems and Alternate Service Delivery (ASD) initiatives.
  • Skip Lumley – Developing and Implementing a Pan-Canadian Standard for Public Sector Business Architecture
    • Co-founded and managed the consulting firm Chartwell IRM Inc. from 1984 until its acquisition in 2010 by KPMG Canada.
    • Leader in the development and support of government reference models: the Municipal Reference Model (MRM), the Public Service Reference Model (Province of Ontario) and the Governments of Canada Strategic Reference Model (GSRM).
    • Currently serving as an independent advisor to public and civic sector organizations on the use of reference models for program review, policy development, strategic planning and change management.
  • Stephen White – Digitalizing Your Business Processes
    • Business Process Management Institute (BPMI) Board of Directors
    • Former Chair of BPMI Notation Working Group and author/editor of Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) 1.0 & 2.0 Technical Specification
    • Chair of OMG Revision Task Force and Co-Chair of OMG FTF for BPMN 2.0
    • Contributor to OMG CMMN 1.0 specification
    • Co-Authored Book “BPMN modeling and reference guide”

Tool-Day (Tuesday) – How-To Seminars/Workshops: Business Modelling (BPMN, Capability Modelling, Requirements & Traceability); Collaboration using QualiWare Web Publishing; Change & Problem Management using QualiWare Governance Workflow Engine; Modelling Revision Management, Back-up and Recovery Strategies.

Tuesday seminars/workshops are offered at the nominal (full day) cost of $20.00 + HST per person with 100% of proceeds being donated to the Royal Ottawa PTSD Clinic.

Business Architecture Training (Tuesday-Friday) – “Made in Canada” Business Architecture training & certification with Roger Burlton.

QualiWare Training (Wednesday-Friday) – take full advantage of QualiWare’s EA software

  • QualiWare Data Visualization
  • QualiWare Command Language (QCL) Basic.

For more information or advance seating reservations for Speakers Day and all of the week’s events, contact Susan Wolfenden; susan@closereach.ca, 613-825-1769. Space is limited – call now!

Please feel free to share this invitation with colleagues.
Help us make this event the place to be in Canada for all things architecture related!

3rd Enterprise Design retreat

eda.c and QualiWare team up and arrange the third gathering on Strategic Enterprise Design on March 6-8 in Tel Aviv. Over the course of 3 days at the Nalaga’at Center in Jaffa Port, we will jointly shape the emerging field of Enterprise Design.

In its 3rd edition after Barcelona and Iceland, our event brings together enterprise rebels inside and outside of organizations, and promote a trans-disciplinary exchange on common themes and challenges, tools and techniques, and new thinking. Despite our different backgrounds in design thinking and doing, enterprise and business architecture or analysis, brand, customer and user experience, culture or business transformation and systems thinking, we share a common goal: make enterprises act less awkward and more humane.

After two retreats, three conferences and with a growing community of practitioners, our focus shifts – from understanding what each other is actually doing, to how to achieve impact and collaborate.

See the program and register now.

Experience Mapping – Customer Obsession for IT and Digital Professionals

Watch the recording of webinar, 2 December 2016

Customer Journey maps are a powerful tool to capture opportunities and pain points customers are experiencing, providing a basis for customer-centric transformation. But how to connect them to the reality of a complex, intertwined enterprise that needs to do things differently in order to deliver on these insights?

Too often, the links to the current architecture and organization are unclear, making it difficult to implement such initiatives. Enterprise Architecture teams find themselves stuck in a logic of operations far away from the customer, while those close to the customer struggle to make an impact on the way the enterprise actually works.

In this webinar, Katharina and Milan will share an approach to mapping the Customer Experience for prioritizing topics and challenges, looking at a practical Service Design scenario from the healthcare industry. Using the QualiWare modelling environment, they will look at what to capture, how to make this a part of an integrated Business Architecture model, and how to guide transformation through shared knowledge informing rapid Design Sprints.

Bios

katharinaKatharina Weber is a UX strategist and service designer from Berlin. She is working freelance and is a fellow with eda.c. Her main agenda is to help creating meaningful user experiences for complex applications and services. In her recent projects she explores the intersections between design and business in disciplines such as design management, organizational design and business modeling. Thereby working towards holistic solutions that fit both the business strategy and the user needs. Katharina is also regularly working as a Google Expert Mentor, teaching hands-on methodology for Product Strategy and User Experience design to young entrepreneurs of the start up scene.

milanMilan Guether is managing partner at eda.c, a strategic design consultancy with offices in Paris and Düsseldorf. He is the author of INTERSECTION, a book introducing the enterprise design approach for holistic design in complex enterprises, and co-organising the INTERSECTION conference series about strategic enterprise design. Milan works with organisations like Google, SAP, Boeing, Toyota and the UN, as well as smaller organisations and start-up companies. He has been a designer and architect for over 12 years. Before co-founding eda.c, he worked as a freelance UX strategist and launched a social software startup. Milan co-leads the Paris chapter of the Interaction Design Association and teaches Design Management at the Paris College of Art.

Sign up here.

Technology as a Means to Sustain Medical Innovation

As we’ve seen with recent outbreaks like the Zika Virus in Brazil, medical conditions and diseases are in constant flux. Concurrently, the medical field has made tremendous advances over the past century. Looking at these developments, it’s important for members of the healthcare community to understand how technology can improve their ability to provide health services and deliver important medicines to those who need it most. While the amount of technology currently supporting the public and private sector can be daunting, this vast landscape of systems can be more systematically organized to help provide primary care services, expedite medical research and retain a more comprehensive view of patient history. This article will explore how Enterprise Architecture and Application Portfolio Management can aid in these efforts and ultimately create a stronger technology infrastructure for health systems.

Before attempting to solve these issues, one must acknowledge that the potential of healthcare technology is still very much in the process of being realized. As we have seen from some of the health industry’s leading institutions, organizations are looking to increase collaboration between the staff members of their respective organizations. For example, many pharmaceutical companies are looking to technology integration to increase efficiency and transparency in the supply chain for important drugs and medicine. The value in this is easily understood and it is something that technology can continue to encourage. Reducing the time to market for innovative medicine can only help medical practitioners and hopefully lower operating costs for those organizations working to discover valuable new medicines and vaccines every day.

Building on these points, Application Portfolio Management can serve as a highly useful methodology for healthcare organizations. With the mass of technology systems currently operating in and supporting healthcare environments, it’s difficult to monitor their importance to organizational operations. Using Application Portfolio Management, IT staff can target which applications are the most relevant to the health system’s operations and enhance or decommission antiquated systems when necessary. Healthcare priorities are constantly changing and this governance capability will enable IT executives to see when they can reduce costs and save valuable funds to be used on other initiatives.

Similarly, creating a more coherent technology ecosystem throughout health systems may extract certain benefits. For instance, better coordination between healthcare technology may reduce the time in which patient care is provided. Moreover, this coordination may assist health systems in maintaining a more comprehensive record of patient history between disparate systems and specialists. Organizations can encourage these improvements through a more clearly defined, transparent Enterprise Architecture which acts as a flexible framework for their future IT infrastructure.

Additionally, we should make note of the value in implementing and maintaining a central data repository for those in the health industry. Looking at this, an institution can place their pertinent IT processes in a centralized location where staff members from multiple departments can access it. Similar to the improvements mentioned previously, a repository can also help overall efficiency within a health network.

So how do we accomplish all of this? It won’t be a simple task. Like the Internet of Things, there is still a significant learning curve ahead. The good news is that some of the world’s leading medical institutions are already doing these things. While we can’t know exactly what the future will hold for medicine or science, we can try to spur new medical innovation through improved technology.

A Trip to Automation Valley

automationvalleyQualiWare and 17 other member companies of Manufacturing Academy of Denmark (MADE) went on an Industrie 4.0 study trip to Automation Valley in North Bavaria last week. The trip was arranged by MADE together with the local chamber of commerce and industry and the Royal Danish Consulate General in München.

The Digital Factory

Siemens, one of Germany’s largest companies and the largest engineering company in Europe, has taken its own medicine  – digitalization and Totally Integrated Automation (TIA) – and has built a digital factory in Amberg in Bavaria.

The facility is a prime example of advanced product automation and has received numerous awards. The Amberg factory already combines the real and virtual worlds: Products communicate with machines, and all production processes are optimally integrated and controlled via IT. Siemens
The Siemens Amberg digital factory. Guests are strictly forbidden to take photos. This is a press photo from Siemens.
Siemens says:

The facility is a prime example of advanced product automation and has received numerous awards. The Amberg factory already combines the real and virtual worlds: Products communicate with machines, and all production processes are optimally integrated and controlled via IT.

The factory is essentially a fully operational demonstrator for many of Siemens’ own products and brands. Since the factory actually produces critically-important equipment for digital factories, one could call it a factory factory, and one may start wondering whether we visited the real-world Cyberdyne (as known from the Terminator movies).

amberg-humanSiemens told us that they were quite content having reached a 75% level of automation in Armberg, and that it currently is neither feasible nor desirable to automate further in this kind of production.

The continued human intervention will not disappear with the digital factory, but roles and competencies will change dramatically. Shop-floor work merges with administrative and analytical work, and desktops with computers now invade the shop-floor alongside the robots, sensors and augmentation systems. How the different roles and responsibilities change will depend on many things, not least organisational culture and politics. When sensors and big data analytics become the new supervisors, middle management must find new work, or become extinct, for example.

3D Printing

After huge Siemens we next visited FIT AG, an additive design and manufacturing (3D printing) company with (I think) 200 employees. They introduce ADM and themselves like this:

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive manufacturing technology for complex parts in plastics and metal such as Aluminum, Titanium, tool steel, stainless steel, and Inconel. Different to traditional abrasive or forming technologies, additive manufacturing builds three-dimensional objects layer by layer. Leaving the known limitations of conventional production techniques far behind, these objects can be of almost any shape or geometry. Additive manufacturing is used efficiently for single parts as well as mass production. In order to exploit the full potential of additive manufacturing, its chances as well as specific challenges regarding design and technical issues must be well-known. With 20 years’ experience in this field, the FIT Group is an expert not only for AM, but the world-leading specialist for Additive Design and Manufacturing.

Here are some examples of their prints:


LM-Werkzeugdop

fabatfitadmq


FIT uses leading-edge AM technologies and works closely with 3D printer vendors to become able to deliver ever more advanced products on ever more markets. FIT is growing fast, and we visited their new printing facility in Lupburg, which is already (partially) open for business, as Europe’s first commercial high volume additive manufacturing facility.

Additive Design and Manufacturing is an enabler of radical innovation, and FIT’s value proposition is basically that you can now produce and manufacture some designs that were previously if not impossible then impractical to produce. AM itself is today far from competitive to standardized mass-production, but is beginning to be interesting for mass-customization and complex product in higher volumes. But the real strength today is in rapid prototyping and design iterations for product innovations. For an example, see FIT’s case video about a race car cylinder.

Organizationally, ADM is to industrial designers/product engineers and production engineers/shop-floor what devops is to service designers/IT developers and IT service managers/IT operations. It is going to be interesting to see how this will work in an industrial setting, which has traditionally had very .

Green Factory

greenfacThe last visit was to the Institute for Factory Automation and Production Systems (FAPS) at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) which is a research leader in cleantech. FAPS is involved with Green Factory Bavaria:

The Green Factory in Bavaria combines the research expertise of all relevant fields within energy-efficient production disciplines, such as mechanical engineering, production engineering, electrical engineering, computer engineering, chemical engineering, materials science, and economics. These research fields consider all significant transformations of energy to movement, to lighting, to information processing. This even extends to for manufacturing processes as well as heating, cooling and air conditioning control, which are dedicated for the usage of energy in production, logistics and administration. With a clear focus on energy efficiency in production, the interdisciplinary collaboration of the Green Factory Bavaria is integrated into an internationally viable research network.

The FAPS team demonstrated a range of research results which, for example, use much less electricity than current solutions. Or less material. It should go without saying that such research is incredibly important at many levels – from “saving the planet” over “viable enterprise” to “profitable growth/competitive advantage”. A group of experts discussed the “digital green agenda” in Greening IT. As a registered user, you can download the book here.

Augmented Reality

augmensysOne of the days in Nürnberg was a networking day for Danish and German companies. Or DACH companies; one company I found particularly interesting is an Austrian company, Augmensys, that provides and develops Augmented Reality software for professional use in industrial environments.

Established in 2011, Augmensys is a pioneer for efficient data management without frictional losses throughout the process industry. Their UBIK platform is an innovative mobile data management software with Augmented Reality support, made solely for use in enterprise scenarios.

Augmensys is currently focusing on tablets, but also works with helmets and smart-gadgets of various kinds. The sometimes rather special settings for the relevant usage scenarios – for example underground without GPS, wifi, etc – is a key challenge. Also, the human-device interaction is a challenge, since it’s not always practical to use, say, a tablet.

In some industrial (and other) settings, augmentation technologies are embedded in the environment and interact with machines, robots, sensors and other “things” – and people. For example, a Danish meat-processing facility uses laser projection for guiding the meat-cutters.

Enabling Industry 4.0

So, the Germans call all of the above Industrie 4.0:

When components communicate with the production equipment by themselves, or order a repair to be undertaken when needed – when people, machines and industrial processes are intelligently networked, that is “Industrie 4.0”.

Industrie 4.0 is a central element in the German government’s Digital Agenda program. The German manufacturing industry is, as our study trip showed, already fully engaged in realizing Industry 4.0.

The digital agenda is a global agenda, and Germany’s Industrie 4.0 is of course also a strong national agenda for German competitiveness in the global markets. With “players” such as Siemens and SAP, Industry 4.0 could be Germany’s export good #1.

There is however also a risk at stake: Maybe Industry 4.0 works better outside Germany? Or whichever variants other countries call their digitalization efforts.

The Danish delegation returned home with a lot of inspiration – both from the Germans but also from each other – and will continue working together to enable the continued digitalization of the Danish manufacturing industry. Which will probably continue to use Siemens and SAP as major suppliers for their digital platform.

 

 

Laying the Foundation for Digital Business Transformation

The market is moving quickly, and we are constantly being tasked with improving on performance to drive better results and justify our positions.  To do this we need to bring in digital technologies to facilitate every aspect of the business, and gather data for analysing performance and finding areas to improve.  This goes for everything in your business eco-system: supply chain, customer journeys, back-office support functions, processes, IT estate, and all cross-functional activities.  Your competitors are working on this, to varying degrees of success, and you also need to.

With so many projects to work on, and potential investments to make, how do we make sure our digital transformation is successful?  And provides the quick results that shareholders and stakeholders demand?

Here’s three steps you can do to lay the foundations for successful digital transformation.

Understand your current landscape and digital technologies

Before bringing in new digital tech, you need to know what you have already, where the gaps are, and what options are available.  Each functions’ digital requirements will be evolving constantly, and some can be met with the existing set up.  Accurately document your enterprise architecture starting with the IT and process landscape and ensure there is alignment with organisational goals.  This will provide visibility on the areas for improvement and the impact of bringing in new digital technologies, and allow you to plan for training programs and transformation activities.

Identify key areas for digital transformation

Digital solutions should support the exchange of information between all people and “things” in the business eco-system.  All productive processes should therefore be digitally supported, be an organisational part of the enterprise regardless of geographic location, and the ability to exchange information in execution of a process should be available at all times and in all places.  Customer journey maps, capability models, and gap analyses developed as part of your enterprise architecture will enable you to identify key areas for digital transformation.

For example, the new “Digital Hospital” in Denmark has used its enterprise architecture to understand how all people and “things” should link up.  The digital hospital has visualised the elements required to support core services such as treatment of patients, and non-clinical logistics,and mapped the knowledge that needs to be transferred at each step.  The correct digital technologies to support the knowledge transfer can then be identified and introduced.  In this case, it includes the introduction of robots in storage areas to ensure that delivery of correct materials is never more than 20 metres from physicians, and mobile registration for log books.

Create a Collaboration Platform

Digital transformation requires buy-in and cooperation from people spread across all areas of the business.  The main reason for failure in transformation projects is lack of commitment from stakeholders. Everyone needs to understand the impact of digital transformation, and how to ensure it aligns with overall goal of the organisation, reasons for change, and what they need to do to contribute.  A simple web-platform that provides this information in an easy to consume format, with alerts for outstanding tasks can ensure that people stay on top of transformation tasks and remain committed to the end result: a modern digitally enabled enterprise.

These steps will allow you to optimise the use of current resources, mitigate risks in digitalisation, and ensure cross-functional teams collaborate on your digital transformation.

Architecting the Digital Hospital

More than 10 billion Euros will be spent on 16 new hospital construction projects in Denmark. One of the larger projects, dubbed a “super-hospital,” is in Odense, where the budget is 1.3 billion Euros. The New Odense University Hospital (Nyt OUH) will be approximately 250.000 m2 and is scheduled to be ready in 2022. It will become the largest hospital in Denmark that is built from scratch.

Budget
1.3 €billion

Floor area
250.000 m2

New OUH is a green-field mega-project which will replace the existing university hospital (OUH). So on one hand, it is a rare opportunity to architect a digital enterprise “ground-up”, regardless of the existing built-environment, but on the other hand, it is also a significant transition challenge for the existing enterprise.

The overall vision for New OUH is:

A university hospital is a highly technological and knowledge intensive enterprise that depends on knowledge being shared and used optimally in the primary production – treatment of patients and research. Knowledge in the hospital must flow freely inside the networks and between the relevant operators and must be available at any time and in such a fashion that it can be utilized immediately.

New OUHs governing bodies have established an overall vision for the digital hospital:

The Digital Hospital is a composite term consisting of the word Hospital. This represents the core service – diagnosing and treatment of patients and thus the circuit of knowledge while the Digital is a supporting and developmental term to the core service. The Digital element in New OUH must be omnipresent and must ensure that New OUH can realize its vision and make full and optimal use of the knowledge circuit. In other words, the Digital hospital is a precondition for the knowledge circuit in New OUH.

Jonas Hedegaard Knudsen, CIO

Digital solutions at New OUH will be for all, to all, between all, everywhere – always.

For all

Digital solutions must support all users of the hospital and its functions. Concurrently, the digital solutions will help convert data into information to the benefit of the sharing of knowledge, treatment, care and research. The digital solutions must support exchange of information/communication as well between the different users, and deliver to such an extent that they support proper communication between the parties and in a fashion making it relevant for the information seeker. When the term “all” is used it refers to patients, next of kin, hospital employees, GPs, municipality and scientific researchers at the university.

To all

Digital solutions for all are regarded as any productive process at New OUH is digitally supported. Data, information and knowledge flow freely and automatically to all people as well as systems, thus supporting the hospital processes in the best possible way and at any time providing the employees with the necessary knowledge needed to perform their tasks. “To all” constitutes a movement from one operator to (“all”) another operator. This movement rep-resents knowledge shared transparently and automatically. Data, information and knowledge thus flow to and between all productive operators and processes at the hospital.

Between all

Digital solutions between all tie individuals, work processes and solutions together in a holistically orientated network2. In other words, we are talking about coherent sharing of information and knowledge between all operators in a network. “Between all” is thus regarding the coherence and integration of concepts. The digital elements is seen as coherence and integration on three levels: between individuals, between equipment, and between equipment and individuals. The digital hospital must contribute to information and knowledge being made available in such a way that it can be integrated and utilized between all operators and network in and around the hospital’s technical and productive processes.

Everywhere

Digital solutions “over all” mean that the solutions must be available and integrated for all, in and around the hospital, patients as well as external partners. This availability “everywhere” facilitates communication, sharing and creation of knowledge. Therefore “Everywhere” must not be viewed as a (narrow hospital based) concept but as including all partners (patients, scientific researchers, municipalities etc.) “Everywhere” covers, in other words, the geographical and organizational areas that participate in or around a specific productive process offered by the hospital to a patient or a group of patients. “Everywhere” thus facilitates both and organizational perspective, a process related perspective, and a geographical perspective. This means that digital solutions “everywhere” must be an organizational part of the entire hospi-tal, support all productive processes in such a way that these can be utilized in the best possible way regardless of geographical location.

Always

Digital solutions must always be present and support the user at any given time to be able to procure the requested information – regardless of place and time. This means that the digital solutions support availability of information for the user at the time the information is requested. This means that during an operation the surgeon can pull vital information that the researcher has unlimited access to quality data in his field. That data is available regardless if the user is present at the hospital, the university or outside.

New OUH has chosen QualiWare’s digital business design platform for the ongoing architecture and design work on the digital enterprise. QualiWare is already used at the existing OUH for asset management in several clinical areas.

The New OUH enterprise architecture team will over the next 6 years need to flesh out actionable digital business design, and realize the digital hospital vision. QualiWare Center of Excellence will support the EA team in these efforts.

In future blogs, we will offer more updates and elaborations on the digital hospital.

How IT Can Enable Oil & Energy Firms to Survive the Oil Price Slump

Many firms in the oil sector are struggling due to the steep drop in oil prices.  Across the sector there has been a reduction in investment, and in many cases downsizing.  Planning for the future in these times can be tough, and changes need to be made in order to survive.  However, some firms are not only working on surviving but also putting themselves in a strong position to capitalise on opportunities when oil prices eventually rise and stabilise.  Furthermore, these firms are also making big changes towards digitalisation, and modernising the way they do business in spite of the slump.

Oil & Energy firms, both upstream and downstream, are typically highly complex.  Equipment, assets, process, systems, applications, broad webs of suppliers and customers, and a large and varied workforce are integral to keeping everything running at a profit.  Regulatory requirements are not getting looser but tighter, this all adds the huge running costs which do not get lower as the oil price does.

However, there are opportunities to be exploited.  The big question is how?

Align Business & IT

Oil & Energy enterprises will typically have thousands of applications, and the associated infrastructure to run and host these systems.  Therefore you should start by creating a common enterprise model accurately showing how IT systems support business processes and identify the need for process information and data.  From there, you can define the key applications for development and maintenance, and importantly, identify redundant and overlapping applications to be phased out.  This allows the enterprise to focus investments in the right areas.  Through this process, we’ve seen oil & energy enterprises save millions of dollars annually in support & maintenance costs.  Furthermore, it will allow you to focus important resources on developing a modern, digital enterprise architecture.

Adapt to New Digital Technologies

The downturn has brought forth many new technologies designed to improve efficiency and reduce costs. And they have already started making an impact.  Your firm will be looking into or already implementing new automation technologies, exploiting big data, or bringing in customer focused technologies such as multichannel marketing platforms.  Capital projects will still be a large feature, and ensuring all these projects run on-time and on-budget is not simple.

In order to bring in these new technologies successfully, different stakeholders and cross-functional teams will need to see how the solution fits with the current organisation, the changes that need to be made, understand the impact of change to mitigate risks.  Take your enterprise model and publish this to the web so everyone can see it.  Ensure those involved in change can access all the information they need to facilitate the transformation, and provide a platform for all parties to collaborate.

Set up for Rapid Reaction to Market Change

If the oil market picks up in the next 12-18 months, you need to be in a position to react rapidly to changes.  A well-defined company architecture, aligned to corporate goals will allow the organisation to react quickly when the time comes. This should include each employee having access to all the information they need to do their job, get trained, and understand how they fit into the wider context.

With the slump in oil prices continuing and no concrete timeline for when it will improve, can you afford to sit tight and hope for the best?  Or is it time to visualise the changes you need to make, and work together to transform your business?

Take a look at how Statoil save millions of dollars in annual IT maintenance, support and development costs through aligning IT and business.  Also at GKN/Volvo Aero, the savings were in excess of $1.5million a year.

Ten notable books from 2015

One of my routines around New Year is to look back at the books brought to the market in the last year that caught my attention. In this blog post, I will share my thoughts about the ten most notable books of the year.

Notable 2015 additions to the enterprise architect’s bookshelf:

simonBusiness Architecture Management: Architecting The Business For Consistency And Alignment by Daniel Simon And Christian Schmidt presents a comprehensive overview of enterprise architecture management with a specific focus on the business aspects. While recent approaches to enterprise architecture management have dealt mainly with aspects of information technology, this book covers all areas of business architecture from business motivation and models to business execution. Simon and Schmidt have done an excellent work editing this book, which has contributions from both academics and practitioner. I’m particularly fond of Adrian Apthorp’s contribution.

nightingaleArchitecting The Future Enterprise by Deborah J. Nightingale And Donna H. Rhodes offers a framework for enterprise transformation. Successful transformation, the MIT professors believe, starts with a holistic approach, taking into consideration all facets of the enterprise and its environment rather than focusing solely on one factor — information technology, for example, or organizational structure. This is architecting the future enterprise: creating a blueprint for what the enterprise will look like after the transformation. For this, Nightingale and Rhodes introduce the ARIES (Architecting Innovative Enterprise Strategy) framework.

injiEnterprise Architecture for Business Success by Inji Wijegunaratne, George Fernandez, and Peter Evans-Greenwood is a solid ebook based on scientific work, which I’m familiar with from my time as editor as Journal of Enterprise Architecture. The authors argue that EA has evolved to become a prominent presence in today’s information systems and technology landscape. The EA discipline is rich in frameworks, methodologies, and the like. However, the question of ‘value’ for business ;professionals remains largely unanswered – that is, how best can Enterprise Architecture and Enterprise Architects deliver value to the enterprise? The Australian researchers makes a very solid analysis and presents an interesting approach to the value of EA discussion.

skiltonBuilding the Digital Enterprise and Building Digital Ecosystem Architectures are two volumes in Mark Skilton’s series of books on Business in the Digital Economy. I basically regard these two books as one; the first one being an introduction to “digital”; the second book is clearly most relevant for EA readers. Skilton is involved with the Open Group work on Open Platform 3.0, and lead author on some of the work there. The second book extends on this work. As such, the whole book series is solidly anchored in classic, IT-centric EA. But it moves ahead on several accounts, including the monetization and benefit realization requirements underlying much current EA work.

wierdaChess And The Art Of Enterprise Architecture by Gerben Wierda is a novel approach to writing an EA book. Gartner had the author speak about it at their EA Summit in London, and the book’s message is that Enterprise Architecture is the discipline of managing the complexities of the Business-IT landscape. “Enterprise chess” is used mainly metaphorically, but clearly Wierda is an avid chess player and sometimes ends up being a bit “nerdy” about it (although nowhere as nerdy as he becomes in his ArchiMate book). But Wierda is an experienced practitioner and shares happily his experiences. I think many, both new and experienced, practitioners will find it useful and interesting.

apteAlthough I am yet to read the whole book, I’ll include Transformative Enterprise Architecture: Guiding And Governing The Metamorphosis Of Organizations And IT Ecosystems by Atul Apte which was released (self-published) on Christmas Eve 2015. Apte starts out by saying that the age of transformation is upon us. And for corporate IT departments, supporting and sustaining enterprise architecture requires a fundamentally new approach. Transformative Enterprise Architecture has the solution, he argues. He presents a new “homegrown” methodology that “boldly redefines the characteristics and competencies that every large-scale IT team must develop to function successfully”.

xmudBusiness Platforms, Digital Platforms and Digital Innovation: An Executive Agenda by Vallabh Sambamurthy and Robert Zmud is the second book of a three book series on digitalization management. This book discusses how competitive success is increasingly dependent on the enterprise capabilities to simultaneously exploit their installed business platforms and undertake digital innovation, i.e., what Gartner calls bimodal IT. It is not clear to me what the third book will cover, and when it comes, but I hope the authors will go deeper into the architectural challenges, and expand on the role of enterprise architecture.

raskinoDigital To The Core: Remastering Leadership For Your Industry, Your Enterprise, And Yourself by Mark Raskino and Graham Waller is Gartner’s own “flagship” book on digital business, authored by two of their leading analysts. “In this pioneering era,” the authors argue, “successful leaders are those who can master the key macro forces that drive digitalization, and then lead their organizations at three distinct levels: industry, enterprise, and self”. The authors describe the three primary disruptive forces of the digital era: Resolution Revolution, Compound Uncertainty, and Boundary Blurring.

westermanAlthough it is from 2014, I here also want to mention Leading Digital by George Westerman, Didier Bonnet, and Andrew McAfee (MIT, Capgemini, MIT). This is a must for “digital business” readers. Based on a study of more than four hundred global firms the book shows what it takes to become a Digital Master. It explains successful transformation in a clear, two-part framework: where to invest in digital capabilities, and how to lead the transformation. During 2015 McAfee used the classic tale of the invention of chess and the 33rd square of a chess board in notable keynotes, including at Gartner’s Symposium in Barcelona, to explain why “digital” is so important today (the second half of the chess board).

 

turkleReclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle is subtitled The Power of Talk in a Digital Age. “We live in a technological universe in which we are always communicating. And yet we have sacrificed conversation for mere connection,” the MIT media scholar argues. Based on five years of research and interviews in homes, schools, and the workplace, Turkle argues that we have come to a better understanding of where our technology can and cannot take us and that the time is right to reclaim conversation. This is perhaps the most important message of the year.

Just at Turkle’s book is a healthy “antidote” to Gartner’s and others’ uncritical thinking, it may be necessary to add several more books. I’ve for example liked  Surviving AI: The promise and peril of artificial intelligence by Calum Chase and Rise Of The Robots: Technology and the Threat of Mass Unemployment by Martin Ford, both of which should also be mandatory reading for the enterprise architects (and many others).

My hope for 2016 is that we will see more books following the line of the first two on my list above. That is, books that deal with architecting the enterprise. Can’t we just all agree that 2015 taught us that every company is digital, and get on with it? There are many more interesting issues ahead.

PS: Amazon should stop (remove) this book spammer.

Enterprise Architecture Trends 2015

I’m looking forward to speaking about trends in enterprise architecture at the EA2015 conference on 4 November in Copenhagen. Having spoken at this annual conference over the past several years, it is my annual “state-of-the-union” address to the Danish EA community.

This year, I will talk about several trends and issues. The outline of the lecture looks like this:

  1. The current state of #EntArch
  2. So, is there a problem?
  3. “The only thing that’s changed, is everything”
  4. EA scholary analysis
  5. EA scope creep
  6. Gartnertology
  7. We’re not in Kansas anymore
  8. Enterprise Investment
  9. Enterprise Design
  10. Suggestions

You can get my slides here, but most of them are not very informative on their own.

Although I use different evidence, many of my points are also expressed in my crossroads blog post and article. But I will also bring up several other points. I’ve even invented a new word: Gartnertology. This I use to describe how Gartner is becoming something akin to a religious cult.

I will of course here refer to Kuno Brodersen’s recent blog post about Gartner’s tool assessment practice, but will focus more on Gartner’s recent messages about digital business, and discuss these. And then rather quickly move on to something more interesting, including enterprise investment and enterprise design.

All in all, a lot of content for a 45 minutes lecture. So participants will be told to fasten their seat-belts.